News & Updates

In August of 2012 I posted a blog entitled Films by Alice Guy Lost and Found.

The article discussed two films that had recently been found and have now been preserved: Parson Sue and A Tramp’s Strategy.

It looked like The Coming of Sunbeam, another recent find, would get preserved, if it was not too late to save the film based on the elements available.

New York as it looked to Alice Guy.

Secrets of the Night directed by Herbert Blaché

Mystery. Comedy. A murder in an old house where everyone is a suspect.

These are the building blocks of Secrets of the Night, a silent movie from 1924. For years, silent film enthusiasts thought the flick was lost, like more than 7,000 other films from the era. In fact, it was listed on the U.S. Library of Congress's list of lost films.

I just stumbled on this website in Spanish devoted to Alice Guy, which starts with a blurb from the Spanish edition of my book:

Alice Guy, pionera del cine narrativo

Fort Lee Film Commission’s Reel Jersey Girls Women’s History Month Film Festival in March at the Fort Lee Public Library 

UPWIFT presents:
A Celebration of the First Woman Filmmaker, Alice Guy-Blaché

Three theaters within the UPWIFT region will present films by the first female filmmaker, Alice Guy-Blaché, as well as sneak-peeks into a new documentary about Alice by Pamela Green and a Q&A with the filmmaker.

Press release for the three events here.

Upstate Films/Rhinebeck, Sunday, December 11, 1:00PM:

A retrospective of Alice Guy's films will be shown tonight (September 23) as part of the Woman with a Movie Camera series at the Anthology Film Archives in New York City. The 90-minute program includes:

THE DRUNKEN MATTRESS / LE MATELAS ALCOOLIQUE (France, 1906, 7 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the Library of Congress.)

THE STRIKE (U.S., 1912, 12 min, 35mm, b&w, silent. Print courtesy of the British Film Institute.)

This filmography is an accompaniment to the article "Stereotypes and Archetypes in Early Spanish Cinema," by Francisco Griñán, edited and translated by Alison McMahan, New Review of Film and Television, digital publication  22 July 2016.

The films listed are only the ones mentioned in the article but it provides a good overview of early film production in Spain. Included are the films Alice Guy and her cameraman Anatole Thiberville filmed in Spain in October-November of 1905.

FILMOGRAPHY

* ph: phonoscenes
** sd: sound movie

 

Although we can't be sure who filmed the 1905 Gaumont hand-colored movies La malagueña y el torero y Le Tango, we have identified one of the performers. La Bella Romero (real name, Elsa Romero) was born in Malaga in the late nineteenth century. By early 1902 she was dancing tangos and sevillanas in Madrid (El Globo (EG) 1902, Madrid, 3 January, 3). In 1903 she debuted at the Teatro Novedades in Barcelona, where she was a great success. Her fame continued to grow. She even performed with La Fornarina and appeared in films.